FAQs

To troubleshoot any problems you might be experiencing with an Olixir product, please click one of the following products below to visit the corresponding FAQs and troubleshooting answers.

Mobile DataVault Compatability FAQs

I am only able to see capacities of 127-138GB for larger capacity drives on my Windows machines

  1. Check the service pack version on your computer. If it is not updated to service pack 3, please do so.
  2. You will be able to get these downloads on the Microsoft website, www.support.microsoft.com and in the search type service pack 3 and the windows version you are using.
  3. Next check for the BIOS version on your system.
  4. If the latest version is not on your computer, please upgrade to the latest version available.
  5. Next, if you still have problems seeing the complete capacity of the hard drive, then you might want to check the Intel accelerator program. If it is not on the computer you may download it from the Intel website. www.intel.com/support/chipsets/iaa/
  6. This should allow you to see the complete drive capacity and make full use of it.

“Code 10 – The device cannot start” in Device Manager in Windows XP/2000/Me/98

Windows® XP/2000

  1. Click the Start button and select Run.
  2. In the text box, type msconfig and click the OK button.
  3. Select Selective Startup.
  4. Uncheck Startup Items and click the OK button.
  5. Click the Exit Without Restart button.
  6. Right-click the My Computer icon.
  7. Select the Hardware tab and then click the Device Manager button.
  8. Click the plus (+) sign next to Universal Serial Bus Controllers.
  9. Right-click USB Mass Storage Device and select Delete.
  10. Insert the Solutions CD that came with your drive into the CD-ROM. This will install the driver.
  11. Restart the computer.

Windows Me/98

  1. Click the Start button and select Run.
  2. In the text box, type msconfig and click the OK button.
  3. Select Selective Startup.
  4. Uncheck Startup Items and click the OK button.
  5. Click the Exit Without Restart button.
  6. Right-click the My Computer icon.
  7. Click the Device Manager button.
  8. Click the plus (+) sign next to Universal Serial Bus Controllers.
  9. Right-click USB Mass Storage Device and select Delete.
  10. Insert the Solutions CD that came with your drive into the CD-ROM. This will install the driver.
  11. Click the Start button and select Run.
  12. In the text box type msconfig and click the OK button.
  13. Select Normal Startup.
  14. Restart the computer.

What should I do if large files will not copy over to the DataVault?

This problem will occur only with FAT32 file format.

In FAT32 format, the file size limit for a single file is 4GB. An individual file that is 4GB or larger cannot be copied to the Iomega Hard Drive due to FAT32 file format constraints.

If you have a single file that is 4GB or larger, try using a file compression utility to make the file smaller. If you can compress it to less than 4GB, you should be able to copy it to the DataVault without any problems.

What formats are supported on the DataVault?

The DataVault can be formatted in FAT32, NTFS or Macintosh HFS or HFS+. When using an external drive that may be used on different operating systems, the recommendation is FAT32 for compatibility across multiple operating systems.

How do I convert FAT disks to NTFS on Windows XP?

FAT32 is pre-loaded onto your DataVault portable drive, but Windows XP won't read your disk. This likely occurs because your version of XP uses the NTFS format, which is incompatible with FAT32.

This problem can occur when you are trying to transfer files from a computer with Windows 98/2000 or older operating system to a computer with XP or new OS.

Solution:

Use the convert utility to convert FAT32 to an NTFS format.

To fix:

  1. Click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then press ENTER.
  2. Type: chkdsk <volume letter of your DataVault drive>: /fs:ntfs /v

    Note: You may receive request for volume label. Hit return and ignore error message. You should be able to see contents of your portable DataVault using Windows.

How much free space is required to convert FAT disks to NTFS?

This article provides a description of the process that Convert.exe uses to convert a disk partition from file allocation table (FAT) to the NTFS file system. The article also discusses the space that is required for conversion.

More Information

The conversion of a disk partition from FAT to NTFS requires a certain amount of free disk space for building the NTFS disk structures. FAT and NTFS use very different on-disk structures to represent the allocation of space for files. These structures are often referred to as "metadata" or "file system overhead."

FAT and NTFS Overhead

FAT metadata consists of a boot sector, one or more file allocation tables, a root directory structure of fixed size, and a variable amount of space for each subdirectory. The space for each subdirectory is related to the number of files that are in the subdirectory.

Another kind of overhead is associated with both FAT and NTFS. Both file systems allocate disk space in clusters of a fixed size. The exact size of these allocation units or clusters is determined at format time, and the defaults are dependent on the size of the volume. On volumes of similar size, the default cluster size for NTFS is smaller than the default cluster size for FAT.

Because space for file data can be allocated only in whole cluster amounts, even a 1-byte file uses a whole cluster's worth of disk space on a FAT volume. (Space usage issues for NTFS are similar but slightly more complicated, and those issues are not covered in detail in this article).

Like FAT, the NTFS file system has a certain amount of fixed-size overhead and a certain amount of per-file overhead. NTFS also has several advanced features, including recoverability, security, and support for very large volumes. Because of these advanced features, the NTFS metadata overhead is somewhat larger than the FAT metadata overhead. On the other hand, because NTFS cluster overhead is smaller than FAT cluster overhead, it is often possible to store at least as much on an NTFS volume as on a FAT volume, even without using NTFS file compression.

The Conversion Process

To guard against corruption that can be caused by failure during conversion, the Convert.exe utility must build the NTFS metadata by using only the space that the FAT file system considers to be free space. That way, if the conversion does not succeed, the FAT representation of the user files is still valid.

A complicating factor for this strategy is that one sector of NTFS data must occupy a specific location on the disk, and a very limited number of other structures must occupy adjacent sectors.

In the conversion process, Convert.exe performs these tasks:

Convert.exe relocates FAT clusters to create space for the fixed-location NTFS structure and other adjacent data, and then saves the new FAT. If the necessary sectors cannot be made available (for example, if the sectors are unreadable), the conversion process stops. The FAT volume is in the same condition as before the attempted conversion.

In the free space in the FAT volume, Convert.exe creates the elementary NTFS data structures, that is, the fixed-size tables and structures that are common to any NTFS volume. The size of these tables depends on the size of the volume but does not depend on the number of files on the volume.

Convert.exe creates the NTFS master file table and directory listings in the free space on the FAT volume. The space required for this step is variable and depends on the total number of files on the FAT volume.

In the NTFS bitmap, Convert.exe marks as "free" those NTFS clusters that are being used by FAT-specific structures. After the conversion is complete, NTFS can reclaim the FAT metadata overhead as free space.

Finally, Convert.exe writes the NTFS boot sector. This final action causes the volume to be recognized as NTFS rather than FAT. (If the conversion fails at any earlier step, the volume is still recognized as a valid FAT volume).

Because a crash can occur at any time, the conversion process minimizes the chance of disk corruption.

Almost all of the writes are to free FAT space, so failure preserves the FAT intact. The only times when Convert.exe writes to space that is not free--that is, the times at which a failure can cause problems--are:

At the end of step 1, when Convert.exe overwrites the FAT.

The algorithm for relocating clusters guarantees that if a failure does take place during this stage, Chkdsk can fix the disk with no loss of data. In step 5, when Convert.exe writes the boot sector.

The system partition is the active, primary partition that starts the computer. If a failure occurs while the system partition is being converted, there is a chance that the computer could be unable to start. It is not likely that such a failure will occur, but if it does occur, you can still use a (floppy) boot disk to start the computer.

The Computation Process

Before starting the conversion process, Convert.exe performs a computation to figure out how much free space is required, based on the number of preexisting files on the FAT volume and on the size of the volume. For standard hardware (a hard drive that has 512 bytes per sector), the computation is done like this:

  • Start by taking the size of the volume, in bytes, and dividing by 100.
  • If this value is less than 1,048,576, use 1,048,576. If the value is larger than 4,194,304, use 4,194,304.
  • Add the size of the volume in bytes, divided by 803.
  • Add the number of files and directories that are on the volume, multiplied by 1,280.
  • Add 196,096.
  • If there is extended attribute information on the FAT volume, Convert.exe also considers the additional space that is required. (Extended attribute information is normally not present. It is a consideration only if the computer had been running OS/2 and extended attributes were in use).

The computation that is described closely approximates the computation that Convert.exe performs. The exact result on any given system may differ slightly.

The computation yields the amount of free space that Convert.exe requires before attempting a conversion. The computation includes an allowance for the possibility of encountering bad sectors in the free space in the FAT volume.

If a volume has just enough free space to begin the conversion, and if a significant fraction of drive space is discovered to be unusable, the conversion process may fail. However, because the design is for the volume to automatically fall back to being recognized as FAT, failure does not necessarily produce any disk corruption.

Special Considerations

If you use the Convert.exe command, be aware of these considerations:

  • If Convert.exe cannot lock the drive (for example, the system volume or the current drive), Convert.exe offers to convert the drive next time the computer restarts.
  • The location of the master file table (MFT) is different on volumes that have been converted from previous versions of NTFS, so volume performance might not be as good on volumes that are converted from Windows NT.
  • Compared with volumes that are initially formatted with NTFS, volumes that are converted from FAT to NTFS lack some performance benefits. On converted volumes, the MFT can become fragmented. In addition, on converted boot volumes, NTFS permissions are not applied after the volume is converted.

DataVault is not recognized by my system even after setting the jumpers correctly

You want to disconnect it and restore the connection back again in the proper orientation.

Figure 1A

Olixir FAQ - DataVault is not recognized by my system even after setting the jumpers correctly Figure 1

Figure 1B

Olixir FAQ - DataVault is not recognized by my system even after setting the jumpers correctly Figure 2
  1. Plug (F) of your DataVault power cable into a nearby electrical outlet and (C) into your DataVault (A) (see Figure 1A). Slide the switch at the back to the ON position (See Figure 1B). The green LED will come on indicating that DataVault is ready to be used.
  2. Wait for 10 seconds before you connect any other cables.
  3. Connect any of the DataVault cables (D) into the back of your DataVault (B)and then connect (E) of the cable into an available port on your computer.
  4. Windows will detect that new hardware is being added. Follow the instructions on the screen.
  5. Once the installation is complete, a DataVault icon will appear in the My Computer folder. Congratulations, you are now ready to use your DataVault.

Can i use the DataVault on both Mac and Windows OS?

If you plan on using DataVault between Mac and Windows systems you should limit FAT32 volumes to sizes of 32GB or less.

If the drive is only used with Mac Operating Systems it is highly recommended to reformat the External drive using the Mac HFS+ File System.

Mobile DataVault Hardware FAQs

My system hangs when I disconnect the DataVault

Check to see if the Green LED light is still flashing.

If you disconnect the DataVault when data is transferring, your system may lock up and data loss can occur. Always check that DataVault is not transferring data before disconnecting it.

Follow the proper procedure to disconnect DataVault from the system. If DataVault is not properly disconnected from the system, the system may lock up or data loss can occur. Please use the following steps.

Windows

  1. Close any open files or programs (including any open windows on those programs) to ensure that the drive is not in use.
  2. On the right hand side of the taskbar, locate the Unplug or Eject Hardware icon.

If the Unplug or Eject Hardware icon is present:

  1. Right-click the Unplug or Eject Hardware icon, highlight your drive and then click Safely Remove.
    Or
  2. Double-click the Unplug or Eject Hardware icon.
  3. Click the device component listed for your drive and click the Stop button.

Macintosh

  1. Check that the drive is not in use.
  2. Click the drive icon and then drag it onto the trash.

My computer shows less drive capacity than on the box label

Hard drive capacity is defined in terms of decimal (base 10) capacity. In decimal notation, one megabyte (MB) is equal to one million bytes and one gigabyte (GB) is equal to one billion bytes. We are most accustomed to the decimal system in everyday life. However, computers use the binary (base 2) numbering system. In the binary numbering system, one megabyte is equal to 1,048,576 bytes, and one gigabyte is equal to 1,073,741,824 bytes.

Both Windows and Mac OS use the binary numbering system. When you use your system to check your drive' capacity, multiply the value shown (displayed in base 2 megabytes) by 1,048,576 to determine the decimal equivalent for the hard drive's capacity.

Here is an example of a 160 GB drive running on a windows system (all versions):

  1. Double-click on the My Computer icon.
  2. Choose the eternal hard drive.
  3. Right-click on the external hard drive and select Properties.

An information box will appear displaying the drive's capacity in both the numbering systems showing 152 GB and 163,921,571,840 bytes (assuming the model is labeled 160 GB).

How do I safely remove DataVault while the computer is on?

Windows

  1. Close any open files or programs (including any open windows on those programs) to ensure that the drive is not in use.
  2. On the right hand side of the taskbar, locate the Unplug or Eject Hardware icon.

If the Unplug or Eject Hardware icon is present:

  • Right-click the Unplug or Eject Hardware icon, highlight your drive and then click Safely Remove.

Or

  • Double-click the Unplug or Eject Hardware icon.
  • Click the device component listed for your drive and click the Stop button.

Macintosh

  1. Check that the drive is not in use.
  2. Click the drive icon and then drag it onto the trash.

How do I know if my computer has USB 2.0 or USB 1.1 support?

Most computers ship with built-in USB 1.1 ports that support USB 1.1 device speeds only. USB 2.0 support is usually added to a computer via a USB 2.0 add-in card, though some newer computers may have USB 2.0 ports built-in.

Please use the following steps to determine if your computer has USB 1.1 or USB 2.0 ports.

Note: Apple does not provide native support for USB 2.0; therefore, USB 2.0 speeds are not supported when using USB 2.0 devices on Macintosh operating systems at this time. Windows 98/Me

  1. Right-click the My Computer icon and select Properties.
  2. Click the Device Manager tab.
  3. Click the plus (+) sign next to Universal Serial Bus Controllers.

Note: If Universal Serial Bus Controllers is not listed, there is a problem with the USB controller or the USB controller is not enabled in the computer's BIOS. Please contact the computer or card manufacturer for updated drivers and/or for information on how to fix or enable the USB controller.

  • If Enhanced Host Controller and/or USB 2.0 Root Hub Device is listed, then the computer has USB 2.0 ports.
  • If Universal Host Controller and/or Open Host Controller is listed, then the computer has USB 1.1 ports. Windows® 2000/XP
    1. Right-click the My Computer icon and select Manage.

      Note: Windows XP users may need to click Start to access the My Computer icon.

    2. Click the Device Manager icon.
    3. Click the plus (+) sign next to Universal Serial Bus Controllers.

      Note: If Universal Serial Bus Controllers is not listed, there is a problem with the USB controller or the USB controller is not enabled in the computer's BIOS. Please contact the computer or card manufacturer for updated drivers and/or for information on how to fix or enable the USB controller.

  • If Enhanced Host Controller and/or USB 2.0 Root Hub Device is listed, then the computer has USB 2.0 ports.
  • If Universal Host Controller and/or Open Host Controller is listed, then the computer has USB 1.1 ports.

Can I hot plug the DataVault?

Yes. You can hot plug the DataVault, meaning you can plug the drive or unplug the drive while the computer is on, only with PCMCIA/USB2.0/FIREWIRE connections. Even though the drive can be hot plugged, an unsafe removal error can occur when the drive is disconnected from a system.

Also look for the safe removal of the drive on the How do I safely remove the DataVault while the computer is on? page.

Mobile DataVault Installation FAQs

How to partition your DataVault in Mac

If you wish to partition the drive into two or more volumes, select the partition tab in the Disk Utility program And follow the instructions.

I see jumpers on the back of my portable external drive, how are these used?

This question is for customers who have purchased the Mobile DataVault 3DX and 2LX products with jumpers at the back of the drive, the answer that follows should only be used if the back of your drive has the jumpers that are shown here:

Figure 1 . Back of Olixir Mobile DataVault 3DX and 2LX (with Jumpers)

Olixir FAQ - I see jumpers on the back of my portable external drive, how are these used? Figure 1

If your drive does not have jumpers, then you have purchased a more recent model of our external drive (most likely after September 2004) in which a small switch is present under the larger power switch. If this is the case, please refer to the FAQ question. I see two switches at the back of my portable external drive, how do I use these?

Only proceed further in using this FAQ if you DO have jumpers as shown above.

The jumpers are used to switch the drive from Cable Mode to Docking Bay Mode, or vice versa. Cable Mode is used only when the drive is connected to a host via Olixir's USB 2.0, Firewire, or Serial ATA cable. Docking bay mode is used only when the drive is plugged into Olixir's 5.25 inch docking bay or a chassis. You must have the external drive jumper's correctly configured for the interface you are using to ensure proper operation of the drive.

You can interchange external drive operation between docking bay and cable bay mode if you switch jumpers. Make sure the power switch is turned off before making jumper changes.

Here are the correct jumper settings for each mode (use tweezers to change the jumpers):

Cable Mode:Use when using the external drive with Olixir's USB 2.0, Firewire, or Serial-ATA cable. You must also have the power supply connected to the power supply connector at the back of the drive (see above figure for the location of this connector).

The settings for Cable Mode vary based on which model of Olixir's external hard drive you are using. Please see the label on the bottom of your product to determine correct model. Incorrect jumper settings will prevent drive from being operable, so please take care in ensuring the correct model's jumper setting is used:

Mobile DataVault 3DX Cable Mode Jumper Setting

Olixir FAQ - I see jumpers on the back of my portable external drive, how are these used? Figure 2

Mobile DataVault 3DX Cable Mode Jumper Setting

Olixir FAQ - I see jumpers on the back of my portable external drive, how are these used? Figure 3

The drive is operational when the power switch is to the right (towards the red bumper). The drive is off when the power switch is to the left. If the drive is not operating properly, make sure cables are properly and securely connected. Please refer to the instruction manual for the drive to ensure that the proper order is used for connecting cables and turning on the drive.

Docking Bay Mode

Use when using the external drive with a chassis or 5.25 inch docking bay.

Mobile DataVault 2LX Docking Bay Jumper Setting

Olixir FAQ - I see jumpers on the back of my portable external drive, how are these used? Figure 4

The drive is operational when the power switch (see Figure 1 above) is to the left (away from the bumper).

Purpose of Jumpers (for your information)

The jumper setting controls where the external drive derives power from. When the drive is used with USB 2.0, Firewire, or Serial-ATA cables, the external drive must derive its power via the power supply connector at the back of the drive (see below). When in Docking Bay Mode, the external drive must derive its power via the docking bay/chassis connection to the drive. The jumpers control the electronics internally to ensure the external drive derives its power from the appropriate source depending on which mode the drive is in.

When using DataBay, DataVault does not come up recognized. (Also a red light is seen)

  1. Disconnect the drive by shutting down the computer.
  2. Check the jumper settings to see if it is set for internal configuration. Olixir FAQ - When using DataBay, DataVault does not come up recognized. (Also a red light is seen)
  3. If not reset them to the correct setting and proceed through the installation
  4. Also check the power switch.

    Picture 4-2

  5. Set the switch to the off position.

When using cables the installation for DataVault is correctly done but the operating system doesn’t recognize it

  1. Disconnect the drive by unplugging the power.
  2. Check the jumper settings in Set A to see if it is set for external configuration.

    External Configuration:

    Picture 3-1

  3. If not reset them to the correct setting and proceed through the installation.

Note: The jumper in the last pin on the top six pins is just fixed on one pin. This will be in use only if you are using DataBay connectivity to change jumper settings.

What is FAT32?

This article describes the FAT32 file system that is included with Windows 95 OEM Service Release 2 (OSR2), Windows 98, and Windows Millennium Edition (Me).

Windows 95 OSR2, Windows 98, and Windows Me include an updated version of the FAT file system. This updated version is called FAT32. The FAT32 file system allows for a default cluster size as small as 4 KB, and includes support for EIDE hard disk sizes larger than 2 gigabytes (GB).

NOTE: Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 does not support the FAT32 file system.

FAT 32 Features

FAT32 provides the following enhancements over previous implementations of the FAT file system:

  • FAT32 supports drives up to 2 terabytes in size.

    NOTE: Microsoft Windows 2000 only supports FAT32 partitions up to a size of 32 GB.

  • FAT32 uses space more efficiently.

    FAT32 uses smaller clusters (that is, 4-KB clusters for drives up to 8 GB in size), resulting in 10 to 15 percent more efficient use of disk space relative to large FAT or FAT16 drives.

  • FAT32 is more robust.

    FAT32 can relocate the root folder and use the backup copy of the file allocation table instead of the default copy. In addition, the boot record on FAT32 drives is expanded to include a backup copy of critical data structures. Therefore, FAT32 drives are less susceptible to a single point of failure than existing FAT16 drives.

    FAT32 is more flexible. The root folder on a FAT32 drive is an ordinary cluster chain, so it can be located anywhere on the drive. The previous limitations on the number of root folder entries no longer exist. In addition, file allocation table mirroring can be disabled, allowing a copy of the file allocation table other than the first one to be active. These features allow for dynamic resizing of FAT32 partitions.

  • Creating FAT32 Drives

    In Windows 95 OSR2, Windows 98, and Windows Me, if you run the Fdisk tool on a hard disk that is over 512 megabytes (MB) in size, Fdisk prompts you whether or not to enable large disk support. If you answer "Yes" (enabling large disk support), any partition you create that is larger than 512 MB is marked as a FAT32 partition.

What is NTFS?

Summary

When a volume is formatted with the NT file system (NTFS), multiple NTFS system files are created in the root directory of the NTFS volume. These system files can be stored at any location on the NTFS volume. Consequently, damage to certain locations on the volume will not as likely render the entire volume inaccessible. Listed below is a description of the ten NTFS system files currently implemented in the retail version of Windows NT.

NTFS Overview

From a user's point of view, NTFS continues to organize files into directories. However, unlike FAT or HPFS, there are no "special" objects on the disk and there is no dependence on the underlying hardware, such as 512 byte sectors. In addition, there are no special locations on the disk, such as FAT tables or HPFS Super Blocks.

The goals of NTFS are to provide:
  • Reliability, which is especially desirable for high end systems and file servers
  • A platform for added functionality
  • Support POSIX requirements
  • Removal of the limitations of the FAT and HPFS file systems

Advantages of NTFS

NTFS is best for use on volumes of about 400 MB or more. This is because performance does not degrade under NTFS, as it does under FAT, with larger volume sizes. The recoverability designed into NTFS is such that a user should never have to run any sort of disk repair utility on an NTFS partition. For additional advantages of NTFS, see the following:

  • Microsoft Windows NT Server "Concepts and Planning Guide," Chapter 5, section titled "Choosing a File System"
  • Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0 Resource Kit, Chapter 18, "Choosing a File System"
  • Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0 Resource Kit "Resource Guide," Chapter 3, section titled "Which File System to Use on Which Volumes"

Disadvantages of NTFS

It is not recommended to use NTFS on a volume that is smaller than approximately 400 MB, because of the amount of space overhead involved in NTFS. This space overhead is in the form of NTFS system files that typically use at least 4 MB of drive space on a 100 MB partition.

Currently, there is no file encryption built into NTFS. Therefore, someone can boot under MS-DOS, or another operating system, and use a low-level disk editing utility to view data stored on an NTFS volume. It is not possible to format a floppy disk with the NTFS file system; Windows NT formats all floppy disks with the FAT file system because the overhead involved in NTFS will not fit onto a floppy disk.

How to format your DataVault for Mac OS X

By default, Olixir's Mobile DataVault is formatted for Windows Partition NTFS. This format is not supported by Macintosh operating systems. To make it functional in Apple Macintosh you will have to re-format the drive. Following are steps on how to re-format. (Instructions for MAC OS X)

  1. Click Go on the Desktop. From the drop-down menu select Utilities

    Olixir FAQ - How to format your DataVault for Mac OS X? Figure 1
  2. From the Utilities screen, select Disk Utility

    Olixir FAQ - How to format your DataVault for Mac OS X? Figure 1
  3. From the display on the left-hand side, select the New Drive with Drive Manufacturer Name and Capacity showing. Select Erase from the table on the right-hand side near the top of the screen. It will ask for confirmation, and then Select Erase.

    Olixir FAQ - How to format your DataVault for Mac OS X? Figure 3
  4. After the Erase is done, select the Partition tab from the table. In the format section, you can choose the type of partition.

    Olixir FAQ - How to format your DataVault for Mac OS X? Figure 4

How do I format the Datavault correctly?

  1. Check your operating system
    Operating System FAT 32 (limited to 32 GB) NTFS (limited to 320 GB)
    Windows 98 or lower Applicable N/A
    Windows 2000 or later Applicable Preferred
  • Format your cartridge in accordance with the applicable file system.(Refer to the table above) Formatting on Windows 2000 or later
    1. Right click on My Computer icon > Manage > Disk Management
    2. Right click on the databook column, which is usually represented by Unknown disk if the format is not recognizable or has been corrupt. Follow the steps to write the signature. After the drive letter shows up (eg: E, F, or G..) Right click on the adjacent column to partition the cartridge. (See picture 1 & 2)
    Olixir Mobile DataVault 3DX - FAQ - How do I format the Datavault correctly? Figure 1 Olixir Mobile DataVault 3DX - FAQ - How do I format the Datavault correctly? Figure 2 Olixir Mobile DataVault 3DX - FAQ - How do I format the Datavault correctly? Figure 3 Olixir Mobile DataVault 3DX - FAQ - How do I format the Datavault correctly? Figure 5 Using a lower disk space than the maximum allocated will leave the remaining space unallocated, which can be further partitioned. Olixir Mobile DataVault 3DX - FAQ - How do I format the Datavault correctly? Figure 5 Olixir Mobile DataVault 3DX - FAQ - How do I format the Datavault correctly? Figure 6 Click finish on the following screen to complete the partition.
    • The cartridge should now show up on the My Computer Screen
    • Use the CD given with the Rigid backup unit

How do I assign the drive letter for my DataVault?

  1. Right-click the My Computer icon.
  2. Click Manage.
  3. Under the Storage category click Disk Management
  4. Right-click on the upper-half of the window.
  5. Click Change drive letter and path
  6. Click Edit.
  7. Click the Assign drive letter drop-down menu and choose an unused drive letter for the DataVault.
  8. Click OK.
  9. Click Yes.

Mobile DataVault Software FAQs

Why does Dantz Retrospect display Error 102, Error 203, or Error 36?

Dantz Retrospect Express displays Error 102 Trouble Communicating, Error 203 Hardware Failure or Error?36 (MAC) (I/O errors)?

These are always generated by the destination device (e.g., Personal Storage 5000) and reported by Retrospect. General Device Troubleshooting steps for the errors above:

  1. Mac - Does the device show up in Apple System Profiler? Windows - Does the device show up in Device Manger, does it have a drive letter?

    The OS needs to see the drive, or Retrospect won't be able to see it either.

  2. Check to see if there is a more recent driver for the USB or IEEE 1394 device.
  3. Make sure the device is plugged directly into the computer (no Hubs).
  4. Make sure the device is using it's own power supply (no bus power).
  5. Isolate the device.
  6. Change USB or IEEE 1394 cables.
  7. Try another port on the computer.
  8. Try another computer.

What does it mean when Retrospect Express displays Error 205?

This usually indicates the bus was reset during a backup function (Duplicate in this case), causing Retrospect to lose contact with the hard drive. This error usually indicates a device communication problem and may be accompanied by an error 102 (trouble communicating).

If error 102 does not accompany error 205 and device communication problems have been ruled out, the next step is to check for media failure on the source volume. Some hard drives reset the bus when they sense they are experiencing a media failure. Try testing the hard drive with the software that was originally used to format it. Try running some disk scanning utilities on the source volume.

You could also get an error 205 and it means that the volume is not accessible at the time of Retrospect trying to access it. Make sure the source hard drive was not unplugged during the Duplicate operation.

What does it mean when Retrospect Express displays Error 204?

Error 204 occurs when something else is accessing the destination hard drive at the time of the Duplicate operation. Make sure no other backup software is accessing the drive at the same time. Turn off Virus Scanning if you have that installed.

Can Retrospect Express compress or encrypt duplicates?

No. There is no compression nor encryption with Duplicate backups.

Can I use Dantz Retrospect Express to archive files?

Yes, the Retrospect Express software has an archive function